Apitherapy: 3 Ways With Medicinal Honey

Apitherapy is the practice of using bee products such as honey to prevent and treat a host of miladies. Here are three ways you can use honey medicinally.

While we’re all familiar with honey as food, you might be surprised that its medicinal usage stretches back thousands of years. 

Apitherapy (Apis is a Latin word that means bee) is the practice of using bee products such as honey, pollen, propolis, royal jelly, and bee venom for disease prevention or treatment proposes.

Honey is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, and modern research suggests it is useful in countering antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 

By combining honey and herbs, you can make a range of potent, safe and delicious natural medicine at home to support your immune and digestive systems, to reduce stress, to treat coughs and sore throats, to aid in wound-care and more. 

Apitherapy: 3 Ways With Medicinal Honey

Electuaries 

Electuaries are a paste made by combining powdered herbs and honey. To make it, put powdered herb into a small bowl or jar, and add honey until you make a paste.

Electuaries are a paste made by combining powdered herbs and honey. To make it, put powdered herb into a small bowl or jar, and add honey until you make a paste. 

If you add too much honey, you can simply add more powdered herbs, or rebrand it as herbal-infused honey. I tend to make it thicker, so I can roll it into little balls, but there’s no right or wrong. 

Suggested uses 

Make a sage electuary for sore throats and sinus congestion, or catnip electuary for sore tummies. Get really creative and make a range of electuaries to support sleep, mood, stress relief and more. 

Herbal Honey

To make a herbal-infused honey, add dried herbs to a jar until it’s a little over half full and cover with honey. Allow to infused for up to six weeks before using.

To make a herbal-infused honey, add dried herbs to a jar until it’s a little over half full and cover with honey. Allow to infused for up to six weeks before using. 

To consume, spread it on toast, add it to your herbal tea, use in baking, as a herbal-honey face mask or lick it straight off the spoon. 

Suggested uses 

Cinnamon honey supports digestion, coughs and reduces congestion, while garlic honey is great for colds and flus. Take preventatively during winter or consume three spoonfuls a day when sick. 

Oxymels

Oxymels are made by infusing herbs into one part honey and four parts raw vinegar. Highly synergistic, the result is far more than the sum of its parts.

Oxymels are made by infusing herbs into one part honey and four parts raw vinegar. Highly synergistic, the result is far more than the sum of its parts. Herbalists tend to favour raw apple-cider vinegar, which in this application, is used to extract minerals from the herbs. Oxymels are most often used for immune, respiratory and digestive support. 

Suggested uses 

Oxymels are commonly made using pungent herbs, such as garlic, thyme, rosemary, horseradish, ginger, cayenne pepper, etc. This is the base of the most famous oxymel called fire cider

Honey is a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, and modern research suggests it is useful in countering antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

More medicinal honey recipes

In Issue #32 of Pip Magazine, we bring you two more medicinal honey uses, including syrups and wound care.

You can access this article online here as part of our digital subscription offering, or subscribe to the print version of Pip Magazine here

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